Crock Of Gold Hoard – Beginning the Chipwork

Markup Shapes
Markup Shapes

I began by staring at the black and white photograph for a while, and then “Skitch’d” an approximation of the shape of the chipwork inside the Crock. The arrows on the lid are there to remind me that it is quite shallow, and that the back wall and the front wall of the lid should be about the same. The photograph doesn’t show the lid as absolutely full, so I won’t be hiding the base completely, but I do need to remember details like this and bear them in mind.

Starting Chipwork
Starting Chipwork

Since the Hoard has been described as forming in effect a jeweller’s cache of materials to recycle, I’ve assumed that it would be a mixture of metals. The Egyptians certainly knew enough about metal to create alloys, and different alloys would be different colours, which enables me to use a selection of materials. The Hoard was composed of ingots and bits and pieces, so none of it has to be perfectly shaped or even especially neatly assembled.

Detail Of Lid
Detail Of Lid

I found some tarnished silver purl – it wasn’t tarnished when I bought it, but I was hoping it would be by the time I used it, so I was very pleased. It helps to create a bit of a shadow around the inside of the front rim of the lid. Untarnished silver check purl and rough purl, and various shades of gold and copper in pearl purl and rough purl help to create the impression of a collection of bits and pieces, broken bangles, roughly formed ingots and general jeweller’s scrap.

Now I just need to work on the chipwork inside the Crock itself. I don’t think that I have the shape of the scraps, even in the lid, quite right, but I am pleased with this as a start, and it will be several days before I can do some more, so I have propped it up where I can gaze at it thoughtfully at odd intervals.

10 thoughts on “Crock Of Gold Hoard – Beginning the Chipwork

  1. I’ve been following your posts and it’s very interesting! I think the chips in the lid are great and give the exact look you were trying for. I can’t wait to see the rest. Such a huge project and so many details. It’s just amazing!!

  2. Ah – that’s what you wanted the tarnished silver purl for. Brilliant!

  3. You are too hard on yourself, it is looking wonderful. The chips in the lid add depth and interest to the piece.

  4. I like the use of the darker more tarnished chips at the front to help with the shadow effect. I can really imagine being able to run my fingers through the scraps in the basket.

  5. it is looking amazing from here, especially your collection of ”bits”….I prop my work up too, glancing every so often. it really does help….

  6. Yes, I also prop up the work and allow myself to gaze at it for a good while when I get to these sticking points or the tricky bits that requite perspective, etc. having just seen the last two of your posts in one go I can honestly say this is looking brilliant! Such a lot of work, such attention to detail and very much worth the effort.

  7. I’ve not read your posts for quite some time.It’s good to see that you’ve finished quite a lot on this project, the lid looks amazing.Looking forward to see more …

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