I am not alone. . .

Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie
Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie (picture from Wikipedia)

I recently had a trip to London, when I managed to fit in a brief visit to The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology as part of my background research for the Dreams of Amarna panels. Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie excavated at Amarna during the 1890s, finding and recording a fine painted pavement, since destroyed, of which Mary Chubb, who wrote the book which inspired the Dreams of Amarna project, would certainly have known. He also trained Howard Carter, whose discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb sparked the Egyptological fever that took hold in Europe and indirectly provided the impetus for Mary’s career.

I arrived late in the day, and really didn’t have much time to look around, but I did tell the lady at the desk why I was interested, and was rather startled when she said “Oh, then there is something you must see!” and took me to see it. It turned out to be a modern tapestry, woven at the Ramses Wissa Wassef Art Centre in Saqqara (itself a place to set Egyptologists a-tingle)  and named “Dahsur Lake” . The tapestry is very reminiscent of the Amarna style, full of life and colour, vigorous and joyful.  The weavers produce their panels without sketches behind their looms, and I am astonished at what they have produced.

Clearly I am not alone in finding the art and story of Amarna inspiring. I wonder, will I produce something as good?

 

5 thoughts on “I am not alone. . .

  1. I have absolute confidence that your piece will be amazing and you were so lucky to find such inspiration on your research trip.

  2. Wish you would have had more time to look around the museum while you were there. But the tapestry is just wonderful! Glad you had time to see that. And I’m sure you’re not alone in your research. Many people (me included) are interested in archaeology and find it fascinating. I love see what you’re doing with this project.

  3. Oh wow! That’s gorgeous! Imagine being able to do that without a sketch. You have something to live up to! Perhaps yours will one day find a place in the Museum of Egyptian Archaeology…

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