Finished – Tiny – Flame Stitch Pincushion

Flame Stitch Finished
Flame Stitch Finished

There are in fact several errors in the stitching here. However, since I kept losing them and finding them and losing them again, I decided to let them stand. If even I can’t keep them in sight, no-one else will find them…

I enjoyed using the silk thread for the stitching – but then I keep saying that, don’t I? Silk seems alive somehow, in a way that cotton, linen, and even wool, don’t.

Finished Flame Stitch Pincushion
Finished Flame Stitch Pincushion

What really surprised me was just how small the pincushion was when I finished it, using a spare fragment of silk fabric for the back. It was really quite astonishingly fiddly when it came to turning it inside out and especially when it came to the corners.

Still, here it is, done, and stuffed, and the final side closed up neatly..

Isn't It Tiny!
Isn’t It Tiny!

And then I put it in the palm of my hand and finally realised just how small it really is…

Another one for that eventual Winter Decoration Corner, I think – in my chaotic workspace, a pincushion this size would sink without trace!

Flame Stitch Pin Cushion

Pincushion Instructions
Pincushion Instructions

I hadn’t intended to do any of the Frostings Box designs, because I was intending to keep all the threads for my own purposes, but I’ve not been able to settle to anything this summer. I lost my “Dreams of Amarna” notebook (and found it again!), and although I have several pieces I want to do for it, I have no idea how I want to do them!

So I’ve been starting lots of little things to do in the intervals of the next major project.

Test Stitching
Test Stitching

I’m determined not to buy anything for these projects, so I fished out a random piece of linen, and then the next thing was to discover how many threads to use. The instructions said four strands of Soie de Paris, but since I have no idea where the linen came from or what count it was, I thought the choice was worth testing. The left section is in two strands and the right is four.

Four it is, then!

Colour Schemes
Colour Schemes

The next decision was colour scheme. As it happens, I don’t have the colours specified, so I decided to play around until I had something that looked interesting.

I’ve decided to go for green and brown.

 

Second Frostings Box

Frostings Box
Frostings Box

Many bounces and squeaks of excitement…

After a trip to the post box to pay the customs charge (I’ve no idea whether the rules have changed, or whether they’ve just got a bit zealous – Tricia has always been scrupulous in declaring contents on the package), I have received my second Frostings Box from Thistle Threads.

And yes, it’s in the same glazed card box with a magnetic clasp. Sturdy, and lovely to look at!

Frostings 2 - Group 1
Frostings 2 – Group 1

At risk of making everyone drool all over their keyboards, here’s the low-down – together with some of my ideas…

There is some hand-dyed chenille (that’s destined for Placidus, if I don’t find a use for it earlier). I haven’t an immediate use for the soutache or the strawberries, but the Flower Stamens may come in handy for the Violets

Frostings 2 - Group 2
Frostings 2 – Group 2

I’m not quite so sure about the metal threads.

I’ve not got them out of their boxes to work out how to use them, but they might make embellishment on the jerkin for Placidus, or on Jason and Medea’s clothing for The Golden Fleece. Or even form parts of Egyptian jewellery for the Dreams of Amarna.

Frostings 2 - Group 3
Frostings 2 – Group 3

Finally there are two silk gimps (all on their own to the left of the picture) and a lovely selection of fine filament silk Trame. These are in some of the colours used in the Soie Ovale, but much finer, and as Tricia describes in a recent post, the whole idea here is to allow us to twist our own threads, blending colours and thicknesses to achieve the effect we want.

Music to my ears!

A Box Of Delights

Frostings Box
Frostings Box
First View
First View

Tricia, at Thistle Threads, has launched the Frostings Club, which is a thread club specifically concentrating on reconstructions of historic thread. She explains on the page I’ve linked to why she did so, and although historic embroidery isn’t my primary focus, thread is one of my deepest interests. So I joined up for the first session, partly because I want to contribute to the project, and partly because I expect that I will find a whole host of non-historical uses for them.

Lacet Threads
Lacet Threads

My first box has arrived – after a frustrating hold-up in Heathrow when I knew it was in the country and it wasn’t getting any closer to me! – beautifully packaged in a very solid cardboard box with a magnetic closure. I’ve been having a lovely rummage, puzzling over what I find and thinking about what I might choose to do with it when I get the chance…

I’m not at all sure what Lacet threads are, or what I might do with them, but Tricia has promised to release some designs and suggestions, so if I can’t think of something for myself, there will be suggestions a-plenty.

Cordon And Gimp
Cordon And Gimp
Metallic And Metal
Metallic And Metal

The Cordon, Gimp and Metal and Metallic threads are possibly a little easier for me to make plans for. The metallic threads have fortuitously turned up in colours I was thinking of using for the wings of the Christmas Angel, so I may have in immediate use there.

But then again, once the Angel’s cape is in place, I may change my mind and who knows what will happen…?